What’s the Decibel Level When We Test Headsets?

When we perform headset mic tests, we have been including decibel readings to show decibel levels in the background. That may mean absolutely nothing to some so we created this blog to explain the various decibel levels. We are in no way experts in this field, however per the multiple online resources here is a general outline of decibel level ranges.

What Exactly Is A Decibel?

By Definition:

A unit used to measure the intensity of a sound or the power level of an electrical signal by comparing it with a given level on a logarithmic scale.

Sounds a little confusing, right? In a simpler term; a decibel is a way of measuring how loud something is. For example, a buzzing mosquito may be 15 decibels, where as a jet engine would be 150 decibels. Scientist have confirmed that anything louder than 85dB (decibels) is harmful to your hearing. Check out the chart below. Source

Decibel Level Test Headsets

So What Do Decibels Have to Do With Our Mic Tests?

When we test headsets, we use a standard television as a noise source. On average, a normal television volume reading is around 60 decibels. Some headsets are able to drown out this background audio while others can not. So what happens when you bump the TV up to max volume? The decibel reading for that is just under 85, right around 70-80dB. Every headset we have tested thus far has not been able to drown out a reading that high. Maybe someday? We will see!

Check out the latest video where our very own, Danny Hayasaka, takes a deep dive into decibel level reading when testing headsets. Check out and subscribe to our YouTube Channel for similar videos.

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